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dried persimmons

Posted on November 11th, 2011  |  5 Comments

Seen these guys round your local farmers market lately?

Yours may be a bit cleaner and not have the ‘dusty’ look my fruit are apparently going for. Either way they’re called persimmons and these particular kind are of the diospyros kaki variety. I don’t know much else, other than I bought a bunch and they are FAR from any sort of ripeness.

So I gave them and rising and knifing and tossed ’em into the oven.

No salt, sugar or spices. Pure persimmon.

To be honest I kind of lost track of how long these were in the oven for (at 250 degrees.) Probably somewhere between 2 and 3 hours, longer wouldn’t have hurt.

They curl up and get crisp yet keep a chewy bite.

Pretty much like any other dried fruit, these are a bit sweet, chewy and incredibly satisfying.  Sweetness coming from a natural source, hells yeah!

So looking for another sugar-free sweet snack? Try baking persimmon slices, it’s super easy and a great excuse to try something new!

Happy Friday!!

~l

 ∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞

 

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5 Responses

  1. I can just imagine how persimmons would work well when baked and dried… delicious!

  2. Rachel says:

    You have nooo idea how happy this makes me! I have a bunch of persimmons that I bought earlier this week and they aren’t terribly ripe or sweet. I am slicing them and sticking them in the oven as soon as I finish typing this comment…

  3. Laura says:

    I have seen dried persimmons and they are not the Fuju type, as shown above, but astringent. How are they prepared? Are they dipped into a fruit juice to prevent discoloration and take away some of the astringent flavor before oven drying? I have three of the astringent variety and I want to slice and dry them for snacks……… experiment with, not waste!. Thanks, L

    • lafig says:

      I didn’t dip the slices in anything, just sliced and into the oven. The persimmons I used were of the astringent variety but not very ripe… I am pretty sure the more ripe, the sweeter, so you could wait until they are more ripened (if they aren’t already.) I actually have a very ripe persimmon to use up and I was wondering how to get sweeter (better tasting) chips so I’ll dry it tomorrow and let you know. Or you could just go for it, one persimmon at a time. :)

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