← Go Back

Baked Butternut Squash Chips

Posted on October 22nd, 2012  |  7 Comments

Some things just scream fall.

Changing leaves, cool breezes, mosquitoes, layers and football season are a few indicators, but other than football and bugs, we don’t experience much of the other here in south Texas. If I didn’t occasionally look at a calender, it could be March for all I know.

Then again, I do go to the grocery store daily weekly, and get a pretty good indication of the month by the seasonal bounty. Lately all the squash (and pumpkins) have been a dead giveaway we’re somewhere smack dab in the middle of October.

Now that I know what month it is I can accurately reminiscent back to last fall, and my first butternut squash experience.  Ah, the early days of the blog, I was young and eager, and although these are a bit too labor intensive as a weeknight meal for me now, I do remember their splendor and freezer friendly feature.

Chips, on the other hand, are quite a bit easier, and frankly, straight up simple if you have a mandolin.

I, unfortunately, do not have one (though it’s in all caps on my Christmas list – and Ross run list, Ross is da shiz), but I have a sharp knife and it works well… yielding more of a rustic look. Perfectionist beware, this is not your dish.

All you laid back folks, get your squash on.

Flavors are plentiful, with a sweet foundation, you could add garlic, spices, or herbs and find each and every one works. Or!!! you could work with their sweetness, add some cinnamon, brown sugar, or maple syrup and make candy chips.

I’m not gonna re-type the recipe because Gina reads my mind, and did if for me, so lets give her the credit. I followed her entire process except I used 2-3 Tbsp garlic infused olive oil (low heat + garlic + oil), 4-6 thinly sliced sage leaves, 1/4 tsp sea salt, and 1/8 tsp black pepper. Let me warn you, cooking times will vary with sugar/syrup vs. garlic/herbs. Somewhere between 375 and 400 degrees worked well, depending on their thickness and rack placement. The thicker the cut, the higher the temp needed, and the quicker to burn, so I’d keep the chips on the middle rack. If you have a mandolin, shoot for 375 degrees and the middle rack too. It might take a little trial and error, but I’ll take that, especially when the errors still taste good.

Here’s to embracing errors and fall, cold weather or not, bugs galore, optional layers and mandatory football.

Hey, we’re in Texas after all.

~l

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

7 Responses

  1. I’m just now learning to use my mandolin without slicing my finger off (I have gotten a few battle wounds). I have a butternut squash sitting on my counter just BEGGING to be used. I’m pretty sure that if I make these, I could eat the ENTIRE squash in one sitting…

  2. […] part up top yields sizeable rounds, while the bottom part (once de-seeded and sliced) makes rings. Sweeten ’em up with a touch of maple syrup or brown […]

  3. […] part up top yields sizeable rounds, while the bottom part (once de-seeded and sliced) makes rings. Sweeten them with a touch of maple syrup or brown […]

  4. […] part up top yields sizeable rounds, while the bottom part (once de-seeded and sliced) makes rings. Sweeten them with a touch of maple syrup or brown […]

  5. […] part up top yields sizable rounds, while the bottom part (once de-seeded and sliced) makes rings. Sweeten ’em up with a touch of maple syrup or brown sugar. DIY: Preheat oven to 375 and bake […]

  6. […] part up top yields sizeable rounds, while the bottom part (once de-seeded and sliced) makes rings. Sweeten them with a touch of maple syrup or brown […]

Leave a Reply